Senate President Says Some of Hogan’s Bills Have a Chance of Passing

A little over halfway through the 2022 session, issues remaining on the table range from crime-fighting legislation to tax cuts. During this time in the legislature, intense negotiations are under way on bills on the same subject, which differ slightly between the House and Senate. Senate President Bill Ferguson made some predictions on Friday that there will be some form of tax breaks, voters will decide the fate of recreational cannabis, and crime legislation will make its way to the governor’s desk. Delegate Kathy Szeliga, R- District 7, whose district includes parts of Baltimore and Harford counties, held a toothbrush during Friday’s debate to draw attention to what she described as gimmicky targeted tax relief. In this case, she referred to a bill that would limit the sales tax oral hygiene products would exempt. She said the measure saves consumers less than $1 a year. “I hope we will pass significant tax breaks for the families of this great state,” Szeliga said. and Use Tax – Diapers – Exemption HB 288: Sales and Use Tax – Baby Products – Exemption HB 364: Sales and Use Tax – Medical Devices – ExemptionHB 492: Sales and Use Tax – Oral Hygiene Products – ExemptionHB 1151: Sales and Use Tax – Diabetic Care Products – Exemption 65 and older.| RELATED: Hogan’s latest legislative agenda aims to grant tax breaks, but Democratic leaders in the state house don’t want to rush things, saying tax break decisions in the coming years will be on a collision course with the Blueprint for Maryland’s Future Education Funding Guidelines. “We have to be financially careful,” Ferguson said. “There is nothing we can do because it is an election year. That’s going to leave us stranded in three or four years, where we’re facing a fiscal cliff.” The governor’s bill, which mandates longer sentences for violent offenders (The Violent Firearms Offender Act), is expected to pass again in the Senate but will meet in the House of Representatives on a roadblock. The Governor’s Judicial Transparency Act has a shot. The legislation would require a state commission to publish the verdicts handed down by judges on violent criminals. “Participation in the administration of justice,” Ferguson said. The Senate president said it was likely voters would decide by referendum whether to legalize cannabis. But it There is dueling legislation in the House and Senate on how to do this.”The Senate will work through the sticky issues and come up with a framework, and hopefully we’ll get to the finish line this year,” Ferguson said on climate change, and he announced Friday that wearing a mask in the State House complex will be optional starting Monday.

A little over halfway through the 2022 session, outstanding issues range from crime-fighting legislation to tax cuts.

During this time in the legislature, intense negotiations are under way on bills on the same subject, which differ slightly between the House and Senate.

Senate President Bill Ferguson made some predictions on Friday that there will be some form of tax breaks, voters will decide the fate of recreational cannabis, and crime legislation will make its way onto the governor’s desk.

Delegate Kathy Szeliga, R District 7, whose district includes parts of Baltimore and Harford counties, held up a toothbrush during Friday’s debate to draw attention to what she described as targeted tax breaks.

“We’re going to call it the ‘Toothbrush Sales Tax Relief Bill,'” Szeliga said.

In this case, she was referring to a bill that would provide a sales tax exemption for oral hygiene products. She said the measure saves consumers less than $1 a year.

“I hope that we will push through significant tax breaks for the families of this great state,” said Szeliga.

| TIED TOGETHER: Lawmakers say tax relief bills would help working families in Maryland

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE LEGISLATION:

  • HB 2: Income Tax – Tax Credit for Job Opportunities
  • HB282: Sales and Use Tax – Diapers – Exemption
  • HB288: Sales and Use Tax – Baby Products – Exemption
  • HB364: Sales and Use Tax – Medical Devices – Exemption
  • HB492: Sales and Use Tax – Oral Hygiene Products – Exemption
  • HB1151: Sales and Use Tax – Diabetic Care Products – Exemption

The governor proposes a plan to phase out income taxes for retirees aged 65 and over.

| TIED TOGETHER: Hogan’s latest legislative agenda targets tax breaks

But Democratic leaders in the State House do not want to rush things, saying tax break decisions will be on a collision course with the US for years to come Blueprint for Maryland’s future Education Funding Guidelines.

“We have to be financially careful,” Ferguson said. “There is nothing we can do because it is an election year. That’s going to smother us in three or four years, where we’re facing a fiscal cliff.”

The governor’s bill mandating longer sentences for violent offenders (the Violent Firearms Offender Act) is expected to pass again in the Senate but is facing a roadblock in the House of Representatives.

The governor’s Judiciary Transparency Act has a shot. The law requires a state commission to publish judges’ verdicts against violent criminals.

“The judiciary has a very central role to play and I think there have been many questions about the lack of certainty about the judicial system‘s involvement in the administration of justice,” Ferguson said.

The Senate President said it was likely voters would hold a referendum to decide whether to legalize cannabis. But there are dueling laws in the House and Senate on how to do that.

“The Senate will work through the tricky issues and come up with a framework, and hopefully we’ll get to the finish line this year,” Ferguson said.

The Senate president predicts climate change legislation will be passed this year, and he announced Friday that wearing a mask in the State House complex will be optional starting Monday.

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